Drought meeting spills over

What was supposed to be a community meeting about water restrictions was overshadowed by a high tempered scuffle.

The eThekwini Water and Sanitation department organised a community meeting for Pinetown residents to adress issues of droughts, water leaks and restrictions at the Pinetown Civic Centre.

Nhlanhla Mpondi of Cowies Hill raised an issue with his R10 000 water bill and got into a heated exchange with his councillor Melanie Brauteseth.

“The meter burst, I called the municipality to come fix it and they gave me a reference number. 3 months down the line is get a R10 000 bill,” said Mpondi.

Councillor Brauteseth promised to look into the matter. At the time of publishing, Mpondi said his bill was still not settled.

It has been over 8 months with this bill hanging over his head and Mpondi said he refuses to pay for municipal incompetence.

Other issues of concern were the regular occurrences of water leaks.

Nolwazi Biyela, a representative from the Water and Sanitation department said the municipality has upped efforts to curb leaks.

She said the municipality has a database of hotspots areas that are most affected by burst pipes and leaking taps.

In addition, Biyela said the department had underwent an initiative to train 12 000 unemployed youths as plumbing artisans.

The department has created a WhatsApp helpline where residents could report burst pipes and similar matters. Biyela says someone should arrive atleast 30 minutes after reporting of incident.

Cindy Bradley, a nursing sister, raised concern with the prevalence of leaking taps from communities on the outskirts of Pinetown who don’t have money or knowledge on how to fix the problem.

Biyela said the Human Settlements United takes care ofproper RDP houses and private homes with a property value of under R250 000.

Biyela also confirmed that the city of Durban is currently experiencing drought and this has lead to the shutting of water at certain intervals.

“Currently we are not shutting, we have reduced (water) pressure. Umngeni has imposed restrictions,” she said.

“We came up with a plan of reducing instead of shutting completely.”

The number of the WhatsApp helpline is 0731483477.

Advertisements

Stuck in oblivion

The recent postponement of this year’s Durban International U19 Tournament raised a few questions about the seriousness with which we take football development. Strangely, however, rather than thinking about development in South Africa I found myself taking a global outlook and asking questions that I could not answer. Here are my questions:

The constant criticism of Chelsea and it’s youth team is that they produce the best teams but not necessarily the best individual players. How do you find a balance between producing the best individual players and the best functional teams at youth level? Do you place more emphasis on one over the other? Is it possible to promote the individual characteristics of youngsters without making them think and look like they are better, while still maintaining harmony between the kids? Is it advisable to promote individualism?

The game moving to an era that favours one forward supported by other attackers who are expected to also be the first line of defence, is that an example of the game requiring youth teams to place more emphasis on team ethics? If yes, how does that help because at the end of the day it’s an individual player who will be promoted based on how good he/she is, not the whole team who function as a unit?

Piennar will take Wits to the next level, on and off the field

Bidvest Wits has just announced the signing of Steven Pienaar on a free transfer to confirm the end of his illustrious overseas career. While we all agree that this is a great signing by Hunt’s side, I’m not sure everyone fully comprehends the magnitude of this signing.

Signing Pienaar is a just as strategic a move as when Wits signed Klate, Pelembe and the likes. Those signings ended up being just as important for their intangible impact as they were for their were impact on the field that can actually be quatified. The addition of experienced heads meant more leaders for Wits and that is one aspect that pushed Wits to the finish line ahead of it’s competition this time. On the field, Pelembe proved especially valuable in the absence of Mahlambi in the first half of the season while Klate was consistent all season long. But as important as they proved on the pitch they were just as important off it; if not more.

The signing of Pienaar will add to that. His talent on the ball can not be doubted -he’s shined alongside Zlatan Ibrahimovic, Rafael van der Vaart, Wesley Sneijder & Gareth Bale, among others- it is his guidance of the plethora of talented youngsters at Bidvest stadium that will really take the club to the next level. Pienaar’s role at Wits will be as much about leading the youngsters to the next level in the field as it is off it.

The good news is that is what he was born to do. He’s always played for teams who are famous for their belief in youngsters; Ajax, Totenham, Borussia Dortmund and Everton. Throughout his career he’s played and won titles with exciting youngsters and being at Wits feels like it was Destiny all along.

 

Kaizer Motaung is one legend that deserves more respect than we’re showing

As South Africans we have a history of not celebrating our legends while we still have them. It is only after they are dead that we shower them with all the respect and adulation that deserve. We have done this to a host of figures who had proved influential to us during the peak of whatever they were doing and I’m afraid we are still doing it.

It puzzles me how, in 2017, inspirational figures like Mr. Kaizer Motaung Snr. still does not have an honorary Doctorate from any of our Universities. Bra Kaizer built Kaizer Chiefs Football Club in 1970 and by the turn of the century it had won everything there is to win in South Africa.

In its 47 year existance, Chiefs’ influence has extended to much more than football and sports in general. At the height of the apartheid regime Amakhosi proved one of the few unifying sources for the Black and White population in the country. With Bafana Bafana banned from sporting activities and other major sporting codes segregated by the apartheid government, Chiefs were importing the Ted Dumutrus and having them mentoring township kids. They were playing your Wits Universities and other “white” teams in front of thousands of South Africans of all colours in the stands.

Today it’s influence is felt in many spheres of the world. So much so that commercial brands and other major players in the entertainment industry wants to be associated with Mr. Motaung’s brainchild, see the globally renowned Kaiser Chiefs band from Germany. The bands name is not coincidentally reminiscent to that of Kaizer Chiefs, it is by design and that is because of Chiefs- and to a large extent Mr. Motaung’s- influence.

But the story of Mr. Motaung’s legacy goes far beyond those achievements. His business acumen is not to be laughed at either. Without any higher education qualifications, Bra Kaizer has managed to build from scratch what has grown to be one of the most recognisable brand not only in the country but in Africa as a whole. Kaizer Chiefs has grown up to be one of the most recognisable sports brands in the world and the fact that this has all been achieved under his leadership deserves massive respect on it’s own. Basically, Mr. Motaung is running a business empire that he, not single-handedly of course, built from nothing but today it’s so ahead of its peers that everyone wants a piece of it.

There are many honorary doctors out there who have not touched and changed as many lives as Kaizer Motaung, can only wish to build half a brand as influential as Chiefs and who have not provided half as selfless service to the country and the continent of Africa. Admittedly, an honorary doctorate is not the only way we can give show our respect and appreciation for legends like Mr. Motaung.

Of course he got the Entrepreneurial Leadership award by the Henley Management Collage 13 years ago but is that enough for the epitomy of black excellence? Is that enough for the man who left South Africa, conquered America and came back to implant all he had learned on the other side of the Atlantic? The one man who learned from him and took his model as it is has gone on to be another prime example of black excellence. Jomo Sono conquered South Africa, went to America and came back to plant what he had learned over there in exactly the same way Kaizer had done seven years before him. In naming Kaizer Chiefs in 1970, Motaung incorporated his name with that of Atlanta Chiefs, the team he had played and, probably, learned the most from. Sono- who had also left Orlando Pirates to America played for New York Cosmos- did the same upon his return, naming his Jomo Cosmos seven years later.

I believe as writers, an autobiography of an individual as influential as Bra Kaizer should have been written a long time ago. It is my dream to get the chance to ghost write his autobiography for not only sports fans to indulge in Bra Kaizer’s wisdom but for the next generations of entrepreneurs also.

The reason I emphasised Kaizer Chiefs is because I want the man to be respected for more than his talent with the soccer ball but for his brainchild that is sure to live way after his gone. Kaizer Motaung is the epitomy of black excellence and I wish he could be respected as such while he’s still here.

Here’s hoping legends like Kaizer Motaung get their due respect while they’re still alive and can pass knowledge to us

More Questions, Less Unswers

The recently concluded FIFA U20 World Cup has thought as a lot of things and gave us a taste of what to expect in the next generation footballers. But if there is one thing that I’m left with from this whole tournament is The question: how did Chelsea allow themselves to lose Dominic Solanke to Liverpool?

This question has borne a lot of questions about development.

Quick context.

The constant criticism of Chelsea and it’s youth team is that they produce the best teams but not necessarily the best individual players. I am in no way questioning that as their youth teams’ records shows that they have really competitive teams. I’m also in agreement with the fact that they fail to feed individual players from that competitive youth structures to the first team, which is the sole role of the a youth team.

However, this whole thing leaves a lot of unaswered questions in my mind.

How do you find a balance between producing the best individual players and the best functional teams at youth level? Do you place more emphasis on one over the other? Is it possible to promote the individual characteristics of youngsters without making them think and look like they are better, while still maintaining harmony between the kids? Is it advisable to promote individualism?

With the game moving to an era that favours one forward supported by other attackers who are expected to also be the first line of defence, is that an example of the game requiring youth teams to place more emphasis on team ethics? If yes, how does that help because at the end of the day it’s an individual player who will be promoted based on how good he/she is, not the whole team who function as a unit?

Only when I manage to find answers to some of these questions will I be able to understand development football, and football in general, better. It’s questions like these that makes one appreciate the complexity of soccer

Tweeps divides on #KaraboMokoena alleged Killer

The brutal murder of Karabo Mokoena has raised debates on social media with others symphasing with her and others her boyfriend’s

Karabo Mokoena went missing on April 27 and was found dead and burnt in a veld two days later. Her boyfriend Sandile Mantsoe was arrested, having confessed to killing and burning her body before dumping it in a veld in Lyndhurst.

It has since been revealed that Sandile had been abusing her for the most part of their nine-months relationship. Further developments has surfaced that she even tried to open a case against him but Sandile countered that by opening one against her too.

Mantsoe (27) is a Foreign exchange (forex) trader who lived in the rich suburbs of Sandton while Karabo was just a 22 year-old part-time student.

Social media has had reacted on the matter with users visibly devided on their views of who to blame.

One tweeter user by the username of @Cashisblack sympathises with Karabo and hopes that Sandile get the maximum punishment for his act.

“#KaraboMokoena I hope this Sandile ms**u gets life and get raped in jail on a daily basis,” he said.

Another user known simply as Antoinette is also of the view that Sandile Mantsoe deserves to be in jail.

“#SandileMantsoe I pray and hope that we won’t hear that ‘there is not enough evidence’ of all this. Can justice be served!! #KaraboMokoena,” she said

However one tweeter user took the unpopular route of playing the devil’s advocate by coming to the defence of Sandile. Cotty Hlatshwayo said Mantsoe should be given a chance.

“#SandileMantsoe can the brother be given bail, it’s his right. He’s a first time offender and not a flight risk. #giveablackchildachance”

Lack of Funding has Young Mens Dream Hanging by A thread

At a time when the government is talking radical economic transformation, a lack of funding has one of the most interesting black owned project on the brink of missing out on it’s big break. The Inhlonipho Business Enterprise ticks all the boxes to give the government one of the first success stories of the much talked about slogan.

“We are a 100% black, youth owned business that is ready to knock on the doors that many thought we’re closed for black youth,” said Cebo Msomi, Inhlonipho co-founder.

We are an egg-supplying business that was started, less than a year ago, by two unemployed boys who had grade 12 as their highest qualifications. Today we have 25 chicken giving us between 21 and 24 eggs per day.”

Though the business is still at it’s infancy stages, it already has the chance to supply eggs to one of the biggest restaurants in the country, provided they get the neccessary funding.

“Early this year we took a risk that has the potential to change our lives forever when approached Wimpy and asked to supply them with eggs. The manager agreed provided we could provide them with 1000 eggs per day, which is about 40 times more than we are producing right now,” explained Lungelo, another co-founder.

Since then we have been trying to raise funds to add at least 1500 layers but that’s proving too difficult in practice. We thought we would sell the eggs we have inorder to raise the money but the money from the eggs can only cover the costs of their feed at best.”

Inhlonipho Business Enterprise was started by Cebo Msomi and Lungelo Mbelu in 2016, after numerous attempts to get into University without luck. The issue of funding has been a major challenge for them since day one but they’ve managed to deal with them well up to this point. Inhlonipho was always meant to be an eggs-supplying business but since they didn’t have the funds to buy the egg-producing chicken, they found alternative ways to raise capital.

“We bought 50 hens that we raised to be broilers (meat-producing chicken) and then sold them when they had grown. We used that money to buy the 25 layers (eggs-producing chicken breed) that we have today and that was the start Inhlonipho,” explained Lungelo.

Though it is still in it’s infancy stages, Inhlonipho has proved one of the most daring projects around. They are taking risks and “knocking on closed doors” as Cebo puts it.

“We are not scared to take risks, getting into the agricultural industry at a time when the local market is at it’s lowest state ever and spending all our savings on a small-scale project was always going to be risky. Doing it as black kids with neither a mentor nor an academic background of note sounded suicidal at first but we’re trying our best to rise above those challenges too.”

The National Youth Development Agency said only the manager is authorised to talk to people other than the actual applicants but efforts to reach him proved fruitless.

Words Speaks Louder Than Action